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Posts tagged ‘residential vpn’

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Residential VPN – A New Era of IP Addresses

In this article we will introduce the concept of using a VPN and their updated counterpart the residential VPN for bypassing the various blocks and filters you’ll encounter online.

The war waged on VPN services by the media companies has been going on for many years but it’s lately developed a new twist.  Virtual Private Networks are now used by millions of people to bypass internet filters, censorship and region locking.   The latter term refers to the practice of restricting access based on your location, usually to due with some sort of licensing restrictions.  It’s very common and for anyone who travels a lot or lives abroad can be a real problem.

For example a US citizen spending some time in Europe will get barred from accessing all their home media services – their Hulu and HBO accounts for example will not be accessible.   This is because they won’t have a US IP address and will ultimately only have access to media resources in the country  they are located in.   Even more global service like Netflix will redirect you to a localized version which can be a problem if you don’t speak that language well.

Years ago you could use things like a netflix proxy free version or even some simple dns-trick software to bypass these blocks, alas no longer.  They are all blocked apart from the new generation of virtual private networks.   Some companies are more aggressive than others, for example I tried viperdns solution with ITV hub and it works but not for most of the larger US media firms like Netflix.  In fact they are the most aggressive and the the days of using a Netflix proxy chrome extension are consigned to history.

So VPN services have been extremely popular as they stop this sort of filtering. You simply connect to a VPN in the country you wish to access and everything should work fine, so you can choose which is the best VPN for Netflix for instance.

residential vpn

Blocking these services for the media company is actually very difficult to do, simply because the actual VPN connection is very difficult to identify.   The method usually applied is to try and monitor simultaneous connections from the same IP address or manually locate the addresses of these service providers and add them to a black list.  Both work but are extremely time intensive to operate and the reality is that the IP addresses can be rotated very quickly anyway.

Introducing the Residential VPN

However Netflix has moved the battle significantly with it’s latest blocking move, by actually restricting access to specific categories of IP address.  The media giant has blocked access to it’s servers from any commercial based IP address, and given that 99% of VPN servers sit in data centers with commercial addresses this move has wiped out the majority of VPN access to Netflix.

Here’s a residential VPN solution that still works however –

This is a big step and arguably will signal the end of many of the simple VPN companies especially if other media firms follow suit.   The companies who merely rent a few dedicated servers and install some proprietary software simply weren’t prepared for this move.   The simple fact is that it’s extremely easy to obtain commercial IP addresses but much more difficult to obtain residential addresses.

The fight has moved on however and some of the VPN companies like Identity Cloaker are now expanding to offer – different VPN services which are assigned residential classified IP addresses rather than commercial ones.   These can be more expensive but are currently the only way you can access Netflix servers by using a VPN to hide your real IP address.    It’s too soon to be certain whether this will become more widespread, although it does seem to be the simplest way to enforce region locks.

It was first attempted about six years ago when a few TV streaming services blocked access from non-residential addresses.  It was just as successful then and in some ways surprising that the practice didn’t become more widespread.  There are problems of course, when you block access from commercial IP addresses you potentially block many legitimate users too.

For example anyone connected from the workplace through a corporate proxy or using a VPN for security would be blocked too.  Imagine how many people use the BBC in their office and you can see the potential dilemma for these companies.  Perhaps for a pure media streaming company like Netflix it’s more straightforward, after all many employers will already block sites like these purely because of the bandwidth they use.

Whether all companies are going to be able to provide the sort of residential VPN  that is needed to bypass these blocks remains to be seen.  At the moment these domestic classified addresses are hard to get hold of for anyone who isn’t an ISP – some companies like Identity Cloaker have incorporated them but they are the exception at the moment.